My American Creed

Posted by Maya L Michigan

My piece is about how I believe if you’re determined, you don’t have to be born in America to achieve the American Dream.

I am the second descendant of immigrants. My grandmother was 22 years old when she immigrated from Lublin, Poland in the year of 1964. My grandmother had the goal of starting a new life, to live the American dream. My grandma came to Detroit knowing only a few words of English and with very little money. But luckily, she had a place to stay. Her Aunt Anna immigrated in 1930 with the same dream but a different story. Between the 19th and 20th centuries millions of people left their homes in Europe to move to the United States. All of these people had different backgrounds, stories and reasons for leaving. But no matter what, all of these people had one thing in common. Somewhere in their heads all of these people had the goal of achieving the American Dream. I believe if you’re determined, you don’t have to be born in America to achieve the American Dream.

My grandfather and grandmother met in early 1966 and married later that same year. My grandparents worked their butts off to make this foreign country their home. They found jobs, started a family and started to save for the future. They were never sure about what was going to come next in their life. My grandparents had similar backgrounds. My grandfather immigrated when he was 19 years old from northern Poland. He was sponsored by his own father, who had immigrated to the USA as a refugee, after being liberated by US Troops in Germany after World War II ended. He was taken prisoner of war as a Polish soldier just a few months after the war started in 1940. My great grandfather left to fight for Poland just 6 months after his son, my grandfather, was born in 1939. My grandfather had very little contact with this father until he was 17 years old, when he started the paperwork to move help him immigrate, which took two years. My grandfather came over when he was 19 years old, in 1958. Yes, my grandfather was an immigrant but he was also a part of the military.

If you’re a part of the military or were apart of the military you are highly respected in this country. We even have national holidays the remember and honor the military: Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Nowadays it seems in this political climate it seems immigrants and refugees are not fully appreciated and welcomed in the United States. In my mind this makes absolutely no sense. This country was built up by immigrants. If you’re not of native American descendant then you are an immigrant. My question is what if you’re both? Where does that put you?

Some of the most successful people here in the United States are immigrants. Steve Jobs, the creator of Apple Technology. Steve Jobs is the son of first generation immigrants. Job’s mother was from Syria and moved to the United States to create a better life for herself and her child. Without Steve Jobs, technology wouldn’t be the same as it is today. There are many other examples of people who are immigrants and who are descendants of immigrants who have made American the diverse and unique place it is today.

My grandparents were strong and brave. They left their home to find a new one. I wouldn’t be here today, typing my american creed, living my life how I am today. We have no right to stop people from coming to the united states who are trying to live the American dream. If we did that earlier, then think about all of the amazing people our country would’ve missed out on. Our country is an amazing place full of a cultural diversity, religious diversity and unique people. People that immigrant here believe in the United States and all it glory. Some want to join the military, become a citizens, find a home. Not turn against the government or cause trouble. As a global super power it is our duty as a country to help. People who are determined to achieve their American dream can achieve it. We just need to make sure we give them the opportunity to. 

Published on Aug 7, 2018
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Writing Our Future: American Creed is part of the National Writing Project’s family of youth publishing projects, all gathered under the Writing Our Future initiative.

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