Racism In Society

Posted by Aizia S. New York
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Have you ever thought about the history of racism? The history of racism reflects on the present forms of racism and how they affect society. The way we handle and deal with the challenges of racism determine our future society.

Dear Society,

What can we change in our communities to benefit society as a whole? All around the world, even dating back to hundreds of years ago, racism and equality have always been an issue. No matter what people may think, since the beginning of time whether it be slavery or Jim Crow, society has grown and has improved in many ways. From the abolition of slavery in 1865 to the end of the Jim Crow Era in 1965 society has changed. In history there were organizations that were created for the benefit of minorities, often created by minorities that played a part in the change.

According to history.com, in 1942 The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was founded and it’s sole purpose was to make a difference (CORE). CORE was involved in some of the most important events in African American history, like the March on Washington in 1963 and the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955. One organization such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) founded in 1909 is one of the nation’s foremost and largest civil rights organizations. These two organizations and others were huge parts of history holding protests, events, and now have days out the year dedicated to their recognition along with important people. Martin Luther King Day and the whole month of February which is celebrated as Black History Month are an example of the recognition African Americans have received.

In more recent years, there have been a lot of events or breakthroughs that contribute to the road that our ancestors and the people before us have paved. There have been fortunate and successful contributions that resulted in great outcomes and drastic changes for the better. In Denver on May 21, 2015 three African American women held mother-daughter dinners to promote black communities, to help build loving and support. According to the Black Lives Matter homepage, the movement Black Lives Matter has sprouted all around the country and is getting support from all kinds of people. Black Lives Matter was created in 2013 as a response to the murder of Trayvon Martin, the group uses local power to speak out against violence in black communities. This movement has gotten so much support and no matter the challenges these people continue to protest and hold community events that inspire people to have a voice. The fact that this organization was created based off of a death of an African American boy is the unfortunate part. Although many people may think that this movement is pointless, that doesn’t deny the fact that a young boy died and many other people have died because of racism and foolish differences.

Both in the past and present the ways of making a difference in equality have been doubted by many and sometimes unsuccessful. In my opinion, I believe it takes just one person to want to make a difference but that one person has to have the effort. That one person could share their concerns with others and it could create a community of activists. Once you have a community of activists with ideas and solutions you and those people can do something and fight for what you believe is right. It shouldn’t take a death to bring people together, to do what everyone is thinking, or to change something little by little. It might be corny but anything is possible with effort and perseverance. So what kind of movement can you create to benefit your community and society to make a change?

Works Cited

“Achieving Racial Equality.” Pew Research Center's Social & Demographic Trends Project, Pew Research Center's Social & Demographic Trends Project, 27 June 2016, www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/06/27/4-achieving-racial-equality/.

“Black Lives Matter.” Designed + Built by Union Labor

https://blacklivesmatter.com/

Editors, History.com. “CORE.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 27 Oct. 2009, www.history.com/topics/black-history/congress-of-racial-equality.

Published on Feb 27, 2019
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