Alienated

This is an essay about how my family affects how I fit in, my motivations to being successful, and my belief systems. Their choices or actions from before and after my birth have affected every aspect of my life.

By Jacob O. from Fayetteville High School in Arkansas

No matter what stage of life you are in, society will put you in a group of gender, race, or even color, and these groups are the majority of the population. There is a flaw in that, though, because the people not part of the majority or fall in between each of those lines have nowhere to fit in unless it’s with another person like them. Some don’t realize how close this hits home for me and how my parents have a key role in it. Although my parents affect my motivations of being successful in America, they have mostly affect my belief systems and have affected the way I fit into today’s society.

For my first point, any person, such as myself, begins to think like their parents just because of the fact that their beliefs can be drilled into your brain just as much as a lecture in college. Since most of my family, besides my dad are immigrants, they have strong opinions on politics. I grew up with their same beliefs just for the fact that my parents believed in that. It could be said that my beliefs were nurtured by the environment I have been in with my family. There is the whole movement Transcendentalism that kinda go against this because I am conforming to what my family believes, but it’s difficult not to conform as a child.

Another thing would be the fact that my dad having immigrant parents, being born in America, and my mom being an immigrant makes them both minorities. Since I was born here, I am also a minority of the minority. I am racially American and ethnically Mexican. I fall under both categories, but don’t really seem to fit into either grouping. I can be alienated from a group of fellow Americans just because they realize I am also Mexican. Now, being alienated would just be getting kicked out of the group necessarily, it would be the feeling I don’t belong because they may say something stereotypical about Mexcians. If I were to go to Mexico and try to talk to fellow Mexicans, and be alienated because of my American accent, or even the fact that I was actually born in America.

The final aspect of my creed that my parents really affect would be my motivations for education. As two young parents who didn’t take advantage of being in America with great opportunities for education, they really push me to not make. I work hard in order to help my parents out and do exactly what they would want me to: be a more sensible person than them. When I go to college, I would be one of the few people in my family who would actually have gone. Even just graduating high school is a good accomplishment in my family. I’ve planned everything I’ve ever wanted to do because my family has given me, or more, I have decided to good by them by staying in school and doing well.

In ending, my family has affected me from what they’ve done before and after my birth. What they have done hasn’t done anything negative, for it has pushed me to be better and shaped my beliefs into what American Creed truly is. I’ve been pushed and molded by the ideology of my parents to realize that American Creed is taking advantage of what you have been given from this country and from what your parents have done for you because your choices ultimately affect everyone around you including your family. 

Fayetteville High School

AP Block

This is a 10th grade PreAP Honors English 10 class co-taught with AP U.S. history.

More letters about "american creed ", "beliefs", "choices", "education", and "family"

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